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1835 Crew Exhibit at the FWMoA

January 27, 2016

An Artists’ Colony Grows on Calhoun Street

Sometimes the simple act of standing near another person who is deep in thought, hands moving quickly and with purpose over a blank canvas can spark creativity. Walking past 1835 S. Calhoun Street on any given evening and you are liable to see lights on and evidence of this communal spark of inspiration. The second floor of this building is slowly being renovated from raw space into finished rooms and as windows are replaced and electricity installed, local artists step in to fill a much needed space.

A group of the visual artists from this location have banded together to form a loose collective named the 1835 Crew. The moniker was chosen more as a nod to their combined interests in contemporary art movements than to any actual street cred. They have collected a sampling of their individual pieces into a show that is currently on display at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art named “The 1835 Crew is…” with the ellipsis standing in for the wide variation of subjects and styles. The spaces draw many of Fort Wayne’s motivated makers: there are musicians, web designers and even a record label, but it was the visual types that found themselves bonding over a shared loft.

Bob Storey, longtime Fort Wayne illustrator to the many local bands and clubs in town, brings his brightly colored, precision styled graphic works to a large scale, with bubblegum colors and perfect, pitch black outlines depicting icons of the American dream. He has been at the 1835 building the longest of the four and finds inspiration in the scenes of the skyline. “The view north towards downtown along with the city noise or silence is always a nice start and finish to each session.”

Josef Zimmerman’s meticulously framed photo installations find curious connections between the empty and decaying exteriors of buildings and the carefully crafted steel, plexiglass and wood constructions that support them. He finds his subjects locally as he hikes through the Fort Wayne area, often times he will “… trek around aimlessly trying to get lost in hopes of discovering that one composition.”

Daniel Denielt’s works delve deeply into the world of color, texture and shape. Outlines of a young man repeat endlessly, distorted by waves of saturated tones. His works are built from the panel up, many times sanded and restarted. He says that he is “…always sanding off work in progress and finish works. I enjoy watching new layers develop. That usually brings on new ideas and directions for me to move forward.“ He finds his inspiration in nature and “from the smallest details to the largest objects surrounding me.”

Kay Gregg’s colorful multimedia visions are populated with the machines of convenience for a bygone era. Fully threaded film projectors stand motionless and silent, both in person and in effigy. The real object is displayed on a pedestal next to the artist’s interpretation. On the wall hangs detailed, almost technical portrayals of the 2 track, reel-to-reel tape player, or the dark lensed 8mm film camera. Why bother with junk no one uses? “It used to take a great deal of effort to document the embarrassing, tragic or poignant moments of our lives. Sometimes the product was disappointing, but in way, more real.“

“1835 Crew is…” will be on display at the Fort Wayne Museum of Art from December 19th through February 28th. Meet the artists at the January 30th museum event, ArtScene, from 7-9pm with an artists’ panel discussion with snacks and a cash bar. 1835posterF3

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‘Invisible College’ was a success

August 2, 2015

We have been busy over here and wish we could have posted more along the way but here is a nice wrap up. Thank you everyone who came out from Fort Wayne, Detroit, Chicago, and Nashville. Thank you everyone who travelled and for the support.

Co-curated by Andrew Hosner, Shawn Hosner & Josef Zimmerman
Dedicated to the energy and strength of its growing visibility and recognition, Invisible College explores the aesthetics of a movement that has devised its own course; one that has been largely defined outside of institutional contexts. Moving away from the standard art education model that demands graduate school, an excess of critical rhetoric and an art world careerism, these artists, many of whom are self-taught, have sought their own inspiration and voice instead, drawing on everything from popular culture and social media platforms, to street art, murals and graffiti. By creating a distinct community in support of the diversity of its visions and styles, the movement has mortared and upheld its own invisible school.

In part on a rejection of the arbitrary division of visual culture that tends to elevate “high art” above the social and popular realms, the movement invoked the countercultural and drew content from an immersion in social experience. The standard of excessive academicism and abstraction, against which it grew, was commonly held in higher regard than more figurative, graphic or representational forms of art. This marginalization inspired the New Contemporary movement to set its own terms and create its own context for the reception of its work. With a renewed emphasis on technical skill, narrative and representation, it has encouraged a social return in art. The Invisible College captures the energetic irreverence and variety that has continued to shape the movement and its spirit of self-determinism. The works included in this exhibition range from the illustrative and graphic, to the surreal and figurative, embodying in one way or another the populist sensibility that makes the movement so exciting, current and relatable.

Invisible College offers a cross-section of some of the most exciting artists working in the New Contemporary genre. As it continues to evolve and expand, the movement embraces talent from all over the world and ushers in a new-guard that seeks to increase the social and popular relevance of contemporary art. Rather than limiting their work’s reception to art world initiates, these artists create pieces inspired by popular and street cultures, summoning the world back into art rather than championing its exclusion and remove.

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‘With Love From the No Coast’ Opening Night

August 2, 2015

The opening was a success and 1975 Gallery was the perfect host. We are looking forward to the next trip with this ever-growing collective of artist. Here are some pictures from opening night shot by Jason Wilder. Please enjoy and thank you for all the love Rochester, NY.

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No Coast @ 1975

No Coast @ 1975

Kay Gregg

Kay Gregg

Steve Seeley

Steve Seeley

Eric Tarr

Eric Tarr

Justin Henry Miller

Justin Henry Miller

Nosego

Nosego

Amanda Elizabeth Joseph

Amanda Elizabeth Joseph

No Coast @ 1975

No Coast @ 1975

No Coast @ 1975

No Coast @ 1975

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With Love From The No Coast at 1975 in Rochester, NY

May 12, 2015

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With Love From The No Coast

Curated by Josef Zimmerman

1975 Gallery, Rochester, NY

June 6th – June 27th, 2015

Opening on June 6th, 1975 Gallery will host With Love From The No Coast, a group exhibition curated by Josef Zimmerman. On view till June 27th, the exhibition will feature new and bold works by 6 artists from the landlocked regions of America and Yis Goodwin A.KA. NOSEGO representing his home coast.

The exhibit will shoulder the idea that the modern movement has broken down the barriers of distance and standard model of the art world. This new series will showcase emerging and established artists from the middle of America. The chosen artists are then showcased on a given coast in hopes of opening up communication between the communities. The old walls and guards of the art world decaying with the rise of the Internet and publications. Through these new tools artists are empowered and informed. With Love From The No Coast demonstrates this new idea as the series will grow and travel from coast to coast.

This cross-section of artists are a part of the exciting time in opening up art across the nation instead of limiting it.

With Love From The No Coast will include works from:

Amanda Joseph

Daniel Dienelt

Eric Tarr

Justin Henry Miller

Kay Gregg

Steve Seeley

Nosego

1975 Gallery

89 Charlotte St.

Rochester, NY 14607

1975ish.com

(585) 466-4278

Invisible College at the FWMoA is near

May 12, 2015

Juxtapoz_July_2015_FWMA (1)

Invisible College

Co-curated by Andrew Hosner, Shawn Hosner & Josef Zimmerman
Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Indiana

July 11th – September 27th, 2015
(Fort Wayne, IN) – Opening July 11th, the Fort Wayne Museum of Art will host Invisible College, a group exhibition co-curated by Andrew and Shawn Hosner of Los Angeles’ Thinkspace Gallery, and Josef Zimmerman of the Fort Wayne Museum of Art. On view until September 27th, the exhibition will feature new and representative works by 46 artists belonging to the New Contemporary movement. Dedicated to the energy and strength of its growing visibility and recognition, Invisible College explores the aesthetics of a movement that has devised its own course; one that has been largely defined outside of institutional contexts. Moving away from the standard art education model that demands graduate school, an excess of critical rhetoric and an art world careerism, these artists, many of whom are self-taught, have sought their own inspiration and voice instead, drawing on everything from popular culture and social media platforms, to street art, murals and graffiti. By creating a distinct community in support of the diversity of its visions and styles, the movement has mortared and upheld its own invisible school.

The New Contemporary movement, widely acknowledged to have begun in the early 90s on the West Coast, evolved in reaction to a conceptual turn in fine art. Founded in part on a rejection of the arbitrary division of visual culture that tends to elevate “high art” above the social and popular realms, the movement invoked the countercultural and drew content from an immersion in social experience. The standard of excessive academicism and abstraction, against which it grew, was commonly held in higher regard than more figurative, graphic or representational forms of art. This marginalization inspired the New Contemporary movement to set its own terms and create its own context for the reception of its work. With a renewed emphasis on technical skill, narrative and representation, it has encouraged a social return in art. The Invisible College captures the energetic irreverence and variety that has continued to shape the movement and its spirit of self-determinism. The works included in this exhibition range from the illustrative and graphic, to the surreal and figurative, embodying in one way or another the populist sensibility that makes the movement so exciting, current and relatable.

Invisible College offers a cross-section of some of the most exciting artists working in the New Contemporary genre. As it continues to evolve and expand, the movement embraces talent from all over the world and ushers in a new-guard that seeks to increase the social and popular relevance of contemporary art. Rather than limiting their work’s reception to art world initiates, these artists create pieces inspired by popular and street cultures, summoning the world back into art rather than championing its exclusion and remove.

 

Invisible College will include works by Adam Caldwell, Adrian Falkner, Alex Yanes, Allison Sommers, Amanda Joseph, Andrew Hem, Brian M. Viveros, Christine Wu, Cryptik, Curiot, Daniel Dienelt, David Cooley, Drew Leshko, Ekundayo, Erik Jones, Gaia, Jacub Gagnon, James Marshall (Dalek), Jeff Ramirez, Jeremy Fish, Joel Daneil Phillips, Jolene Lai, Kay Gregg, Keita Morimoto, Kevin Peterson, Know Hope, Kwon Kyungyup, Luke Chueh, Meggs, Natalia Fabia, Nosego, Ravi Zupa, Sandra Chevrier, Scott Radke, Seth Armstrong, Stephanie Buer, Tony Philippou, Troy Lovegates, Yoskay Yamamoto and Yosuke Ueno. Included in Invisible College are special mural installations by Andrew Schoultz, Cyrcle, Mark Dean Veca and Troy Lovegates. The exhibition will also include a featured installation by Brett Amory.
Fort Wayne Museum of Art

311 E Main Street

Fort Wayne, Indiana

46802
www.fwmoa.org
(260) 422-6467

About the Fort Wayne Museum of Art

Beginning with art classes in 1888 given by J. Ottis Adams and later William Forsyth, the Fort Wayne Museum of Art has evolved into a center for the visual arts community in Northeast Indiana. Regularly exhibiting regional and nationally acclaimed artists, the FWMoA also boasts an extensive permanent collection of American Art as well as prints and drawings from artists such as Jackson Pollock and Andy Warhol. The Museum is committed to the collection, preservation, presentation and interpretation of American and related art to engage broad and diverse audiences throughout the community and region, and add value to their lives. The Fort Wayne Museum of Art is a funded partner of Arts United of Greater Fort Wayne.
www.fwmoa.org

About Thinkspace Gallery

Founded in 2005, Thinkspace gallery was established with a commitment to the promotion and dissemination of young and emerging art. The Culver City gallery is a catalyst for the emerging art scene in Los Angeles and beyond, and is dedicated to the exposure of its artists and the support of their tenets. This young movement, straddled between street art, graphic art, design and popular culture, is subject to steadily increasing international exposure and interest, and is in need of institutional advocates. Thinkspace is positioned to create opportunities and act as a visible platform for the New Contemporary movement, and its aim as a gallery is to establish both a curatorial forum and a collector base for its output. As an institution, Thinkspace is committed to vision, risk and the exceptional talents that wield it. From the streets to the gallery, from the “margins” to the white cube, Thinkspace is re-envisioning what it means to be “institutional”. As a haven for talent, and a venue founded in passion, conviction, and community, the gallery’s mandate is rooted in belief and support.

http://thinkspacegallery.com

Remake Event at Cinema Center May 29th 7 to 10

April 16, 2015

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Here is another fun project I have put together for Cinema Center. This is a brand new fundraiser. Local artists and graphic designers will be make ing mock up movie poster based on Coen Brothers filmography. They will be for sale to the public. Bravas food truck will be attendance with The Snarks play at 9. Barton Fink will play at 10 to close out the event. I hope to see some local homies there for some high fives and good times.
Posters By:
Adam Meyer
Andrea Atwood
Bob Storey
Brian Sterling Lewis
Corey Purvis
Daniel Dienelt
Elyse Boutall
Jake Sauer
Jason Swisher
Jeff Anderson
Jenn Storey
Kay Gregg
Matt Kelley
Meg Tiffany
Mike Green
Nate Utesch
Ryan Pickard

“With Love From The No Coast” exhibit coming this June, 2015

February 16, 2015
“With Love From The No Coast” is a reality. This exhibit will feature contemporary up and coming artists from the land locked section of America. The exhibit will then be displayed on a coast (East, West, Gulf).
The first installment of this series will take place at the amazing 1975 Gallery in Rochester, NY. Opening will be June 6th with art by:
Amanda Elizabeth Joseph- http://www.zggallery.com/joseph.htm
Daniel Dienelt- http://danieldieneltstudio.tumblr.com/
Eric Tarr
Justin Henry Miller- http://www.zggallery.com/miller.htm
Kay Gregg- http://www.eyeballgraphics.com/
Yis Goodwin- http://www.nosego.com/
As well as more to come.